DRINKS 4 DACA

Presented by: Aliento + Trans Queer Pueblo

DRINKS 4 DACA

DJ NICO, DJ BORIS, DJ CERVANTES, JALAPENO ROCK

Thu, September 21, 2017

9:00 pm

Valley Bar

Phoenix, AZ

$10 General Admission

This event is 21 and over

#Drinks4DACA! Live Band! DJs! Drag Queens!

Presented by:
Aliento + Trans Queer Pueblo

Have fun dancing, rocking out and drinking for a great cause... All profits raised will go toward DACA renewal fees to Department of Homeland Security.

Although attorneys and organizations can help fill out the application for free, the fee to DHS must be paid, $495 per individual. Every dollar helps, we appreciate your support!

Entertainment by:
Dj Nico + Dj Boris + Dj Cervantes + Jalapeño Rock & More!

Funds collected will be dispersed among local immigrant/ migrant rights led organizations that are led by and work with DACA recipients. Recipients will be in the phx metropolitan area, must be eligible to renew, and recipients will receive a money order, not a check, to the Department of Homeland Security. As rewards are being given we are more than happy to post updates on the event.

DRINKS 4 DACA
DRINKS 4 DACA
#Drinks4DACA! Live Band! DJs! Drag Queens!

Presented by:
Aliento
https://www.facebook.com/alientoaz/
Trans Queer Pueblo https://www.facebook.com/transqueerpueblo/

Have fun dancing, rocking out and drinking for a great cause... All proceeds raised will go toward DACA renewal fees to Department of Homeland Security.

Although attorneys and organizations can help fill out the application for free, the fee to DHS must be paid, $495 per individual. Every dollar helps, we appreciate your support!

Entertainment by:
Dj Nico + Dj Boris + Dj Cervantes + Jalapeño Rock & More!

Funds collected will be dispersed among local immigrant/ migrant rights led organizations that are led by and work with DACA recipients. Currently we are discussing how and to whom funds will be dispersed but recipients will be in the phx metropolitan area, must be eligible to renew, and recipients will receive a money order, not a check, to the Department of Homeland Security. As rewards are being given we are more than happy to post updates on the event.
DJ NICO
DJ NICO
"El Nico," runs Clandestino, a monthly DJ night at Crescent Ballroom that specializes in "tropical bass," the umbrella term for the broad genre of music that includes cumbia, moombahton, and other modern amalgamations of various types of Latino music. But Paredes and his partners in crime at Clandestino -- including DJ Melo, DJ Tranzo, DJ Musa, and M. Rocka -- just DJ. The live music component of Clandestino -- that is, bands playing original music in the tropical bass family -- so far has consisted of bands from outside the Valley of the Sun, many from Tucson.

"It has to do with everything [Phoenix] is . . . with the politics, with Arpaio, everything else," Paredes says. "It just keeps the Latino culture down. Tucson has been a city that has embraced Latino culture. People here try to fight Latino culture."

A quick survey of bands to the south seems to confirm Paredes' assertion. Whereas Tucson boasts the phenomenal Latin big band Sergio Mendoza y La Orkesta, smooth cumbia rockers Chicha Dust, and Tejano-influenced Calexico, there just doesn't seem to be much demand for alternative Latino music in Phoenix. At least, there's no audience that has yet to jell and unify around the music. And that's where Clandestino comes in.

So, yes, there's deeper motive behind Paredes' dance night. But the number one reason is simply to throw a good party.

Clandestino started in November, and since then, the once-a-month event has pulled upward of 300 people a night. Cumbia has an interesting role in Latino culture, as Paredes tells it: The genre has a reputation as dad rock for the children of Mexican immigrants.

"Growing up, I didn't listen to merengue, salsa, cumbia," Paredes says. "[Modern interest in cumbia] is a renaissance of what your parents used to listen to."

Paredes' interest in exploring tropical bass began after he met Jorge Ignacio Torres (who now owns Palabra Hair Art Collective) at a concert. They didn't get along at first, Paredes says, but they soon became fast friends -- DJing parties together, playing a variety of music. At one fateful party, one of the two put on a "ghetto fab" (Paredes' words) song by a group called Mi Banda El Mexicano called "Mambo Lupita," and what happened next shocked the two.

"People went nuts," Paredes says.

It was that moment that confirmed to him that there might be pent-up demand for modern takes on some of the classic rhythms to which young Latinos grew up listening. In short, there's an alt-Latino audience in Phoenix. Now, Paredes and his cohorts at Clandestino are trying to locate and congeal it.

Paredes finds that some Latinos still resist modern tropical bass, but their resolve wavers once they walk in the door of a Clandestino night.

"I have friends that will not listen to cumbia," he says. "But once they're here, they're always enjoying it."
Venue Information:
Valley Bar
130 N. Central Ave.
Phoenix, AZ, 85004
http://www.valleybarphx.com/